The Benefits of Mint and My All Purpose Tonic Recipe

I hang my garden mint upside down in my closet and close the door to dry. In a warm, dry, dark environment, the mint will often keep it's perfect green color.

I hang my garden mint upside down in my closet and close the door to dry. In a warm, dry, dark environment, the mint will often keep it's perfect green color.

I finally finished the last of my garden harvesting last week. I put all my beds to bed for the winter and planted my garlic and other bulbs in preparation for next year. I’ve harvested some of my tomato seeds and brought a bunch of my potted herbs and plants inside for the winter. I had one stray tomato plant that volunteered itself in the herb part of my garden. Since it was just starting to produce little baby tomatoes, I decided there was no harm in digging it up, transplanting it in a pot, and bringing it inside. We’ll see how it goes. It would be wilted already if I had left it outside, so I figure I’m already ahead.

I also harvested the last bed of mint, washed it, and hung it to dry in the closet. I now have a great big bin of dried mint for the winter. When I make my own herbal teas, mint is always a major ingredient. Mint has so many wonderful, healing properties – not to mention it’s yummy!

Mint is rich in vitamins A and C with smaller amounts of vitamin B12. The vitamin C provides mint with antioxidant properties. The following minerals are also found in mint: manganese, copper, iron, potassium, and calcium.

In my house, I use mint in many ways. I often drink mint tea as a carminative to ease intestinal cramps after indulging in dairy. Mint tea is also relaxing, it increases stomach acidity to aid in digestion after meals, and breathing the steam stimulates the respiratory system during cold and asthma season.

In winter, I often make a big batch of what I call my All Purpose Tonic. I use this to ease undesirable symptoms and as a general health tonic. The recipe follows, along with the reason for including each item.

All Purpose Tonic

  • 1 inch of ginger, sliced thinly (breaks down proteins to rid stomach and intestines of gas, eases nausea and sore throats, antibacterial)
  • ¼ c mint leaves
  • 1 T lemon juice (antibacterial, antitoxin, Vit C)
  • Honey to taste (anti-microbial to coat irritated throats, antioxidant, antifungal)

In a saucepan, I bring 2 ½ c filtered water to boil. I then add the ginger and simmer this for 60 minutes (or longer) until the water is reduced and completely saturated with the ginger essence. Try a spoonful of it. It should be really spicy. Keep the heat on simmer, add the mint and cover it again to saturate the water with mint oils – this might take another 30-60 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat, filter through a mesh strainer or tea strainer, then add the lemon juice and honey. This can be stored in the fridge for a day or two. It’s best to reheat it before drinking.

Sometimes, if I want to add some additional benefits, I’ll brew some green tea leaves into it for three minutes just before straining it.

Do you have a tonic you use? Please share! And if you try mine, please let me know how it works for you.

Breathe deeply,
Laugh with abandon,
Love wholly,
Eat well.

MiLady Carol
www.GreenTeaLady.com
http://miladycarol.com
Dazzling jewelry that reflects sparkling personalities!

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